Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty if only we have the eyes to see them.  

John Ruskin

Infinite Beauty is a unique exhibition that investigates the enduring appeal of nature as a subject for leading British contemporary artists. Victorian artist and art critic John Ruskin promoted nature as an inexhaustible source of truth and beauty and this exhibition demonstrates that this is still very much the case. Yet the fears of ecological disaster driven by climate change and humanity's impact on our environment has given a renewed sense of urgency and purpose to art focused on the natural world. Nature has provided food for the soul during the Coronavirus pandemic but we cannot take it for granted.

The exhibition explores the way in which artists interact with natural forms: plants, animals, habitats and the wider landscape and, in some cases, how their work comments on the ways human activity impacts the ecologies around us. It will feature an eclectic mixture of media, style and approach with photography, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture helping us to look at our relationship with nature afresh.

Works by leading artists such as Andy Goldsworthy, Chris Drury, Elizabeth Frink, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Richard Long, Darren Almond and Dan Holdsworth will take us from familiar everyday experiences to the ends of the earth among the ice and snow of Antarctica. These will go on display at The Arc's The Gallery, some publicly exhibited for the first time. 

This pioneering exhibition is a Hampshire Cultural Trust initiative to bring unique art exhibitions to its galleries based on artworks held in private collections throughout the county. 


Image credits

Banner: 

  • Silvy Weatherall, Confusion, Guinea Fowl Feathers (2017) Image courtesy of the artist.

Images: 

  • Chris Drury, Wind Vortex – Sky Blu, Antarctica – (2007) Inkjet print, 975 x 716 mm. Image courtesy of the artist.
  • Juliette Losq, W I D D E R S C H Y N N E S (2014), ink and watercolour on paper mounted on canvas, 223 x 153 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
  • Silvy Weatherall, Confusion, Guinea Fowl Feathers (2017) Image courtesy of the artist.
  • Chris Drury, Wind Vortex – Sky Blu, Antarctica – (2007) Inkjet print, 975 x 716 mm. Image courtesy of the artist.
  • Juliette Losq, W I D D E R S C H Y N N E S (2014), ink and watercolour on paper mounted on canvas, 223 x 153 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.